Jamal Edwards: Loose Women panel pays tribute to Brenda's son

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Music entrepreneur Jamal Edwards died on February 20, 2022, at the age of 31. A coroner’s inquest into his death concluded last week that the cause of death was drug-related. The assistant coroner, Ivor Collett, said there was evidence of cocaine toxicity in Jamal’s body, in addition to alcohol.

The report stated: “After drinking some alcohol with a friend, his behaviour changed and became erratic.

“He appeared paranoid, before he collapsed and became unconscious. Attempts at resuscitation failed and life was declared extinct at 10.36.”

Earlier this year, in June, Brenda shared that her son’s “devastating passing was due to cardiac arrhythmia… caused by having taken recreational drugs.”

Brenda said: “These types of substances are extremely unpredictable, and we can only hope that this will encourage others to think wisely when faced with similar situations in the future.

“His passing has shown that any one bad decision on any one occasion can lead to devastating consequences.”

Cardiac arrhythmia

A paper in the American Heart Association (AHA) stated drugs, such as cocaine, changes the “structural and electrical substrate of the heart, thereby promoting cardiac dysrhythmias”.

The drugs affects the “ion channels and calcium signalling proteins”.

Health risks of taking cocaine

Frank, a national anti-drug advisory service, cautioned that cocaine is especially “risky” to those who have high blood pressure or a heart condition.

“But even healthy young people can have a fit, heart attack or stroke after using the drug,” Frank added.

“The risk of overdose increases if you mix cocaine with other drugs or alcohol.”

Cocaine can gravely impact a person’s mental health, causing them to feel paranoid, anxious, run-down, and/or depressed.

“Cocaine can bring previous mental health problems to the surface too,” the organisation added.

“And if a relative has had mental health problems, there might be an increased risk for you.”

Alcohol health risks

Alcohol is a toxic substance that, over time, can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and liver disease, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pointed out.

If drinking more than 14 units per week, the health risks keep on mounting.

Excessive alcohol consumption is also linked to digestive problems, numerous types of cancer, and a weakened immune system.

“And if a relative has had mental health problems, there might be an increased risk for you.”

Alcohol health risks

Alcohol is a toxic substance that, over time, can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and liver disease, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pointed out.

If drinking more than 14 units per week, the health risks keep on mounting.

Excessive alcohol consumption is also linked to digestive problems, numerous types of cancer, and a weakened immune system.

Alcohol consumption is also linked to dementia, depression, anxiety, and alcohol dependence.

Anybody who wants help with cutting down the amount of alcohol they drink should speak to a doctor.

Drinkline is the national alcohol helpline, available weekdays 9am to 8pm, weekends 11am to 4pm, for free on 0300 123 1110.

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